Ian Bicking: the old part of his blog

Re: More python education comment 000

There are too many varied and wide goals for everyone to focus on them.

The pygame goal is to make games programming easier. So people don't need C or C++ to do games. 'Takes the "C++" out of "Game Development"' It's amazing how many people are able to make some sort of game that could never finish anything with C/C++.

So pygame and python allow more people to do something fun with programming. I think programming is a useful skill to have. So teaching programming through games making is a fun way to teach something. People who are interested in something are more likely to learn it.

I think games programmers are often the least geeky/nerdy programmer types around. By that I mean, they are often more socially able. I think this is because games programmers are drawn to it for different reasons than other types of programmers.

Music, and games programming goes together often too. People interested in music programming often gravitate to python for its ease of use. However I think python is a little limited at the moment for audio programming. However python-gst, and pymedia are getting closer to allowing complicated things. The 'Processing' smalltalk like language is where it is at for audio ease of use at the moment.

I like the 'mathematician in the street' quote from your web page... a friend of mine is doing a comedy show about teaching maths in a less nerdy way right now. http://www.grouphug.com.au/tmr/ Teaching maths through comedy.

Comment on More python education comment 000
by Rene Dudfield

Comments:

The teaching math through comedy link is too cool (and unfortuantely a bit too far from me). I am all for detaching math from notions of solemnity - and am working towards making PyGeo at least a bit sillier. Why limit representing a point in space to, say, a sphere. Why not - I dont' know - a propeller blade. Nothing is accomplished in particular except some silliness - which is something.

On the pygame front - I had the opportunity to meet with Winston Wolff who is working in New York on a business model centered around teaching game programming as supplementary education, mostly for gifted children. He is a CS guy out of UC Berkeley who has some background in the game industry.

http://stratolab.com/

I was trying to sell him PyGeo(sell as in free but I'd love to see it used in your curriculum), so I did more talking than listening.

But he certainly seems to be smart, with the right background, and committed to his ideas, both as ideas and as a way to pay the bills.

Art

# Art

The teaching math through comedy link is too cool (and unfortuantely a bit too far from me). I am all for detaching math from notions of solemnity - and am working towards making PyGeo at least a bit sillier. Why limit representing a point in space to, say, a sphere. Why not - I dont' know - a propeller blade. Nothing is accomplished in particular except some silliness - which is something.

On the pygame front - I had the opportunity to meet with Winston Wolff who is working in New York on a business model centered around teaching game programming as supplementary education, mostly for gifted children. He is a CS guy out of UC Berkeley who has some background in the game industry.

http://stratolab.com/

I was trying to sell him PyGeo(sell as in free but I'd love to see it used in your curriculum), so I did more talking than listening.

But he certainly seems to be smart, with the right background, and committed to his ideas, both as ideas and as a way to pay the bills.

Art

# Art