Ian Bicking: the old part of his blog

Full stack vs glue comment 000

"Hmm, no capitalists in the debate? I guess "let the market decide" isn't the favored approach?"

I don't necessarily regard myself as a capitalist, but I decided to ignore the "debate" and do my own thing, although this isn't news in any sense.

Most of what I've been reading is just advocacy dressed up as methodology: framework A is doing "the right thing" because of the perceived attitudes of their developers, the architectural choices, the ease of use (delete as appropriate), whereas framework B is doing "the wrong thing" because it does something different for all those things, all according to someone's sense of taste (or lack thereof).

Really, the TurboGears and Pylons tendencies to seemingly mix and match with varying levels of readiness obviously provides benefits, although you're still buying into someone's vision of Web programming, and although there's a book out for the former (has the code even reached 1.0 yet?) the documentation may not convey that vision effectively. Meanwhile, Django evolved in relative isolation, although one of its creators seemingly attempted early on to further the Python Web standards effort (with few results), but you've got to buy into the vision a little bit more, although there's a possibility of slightly better documentation about that vision.

Frequently, people who don't know how to start writing their Web application want to buy into a vision. Once sold, they'll produce any amount of hot air to justify their choices. That there's a technological disconnect between various communities says enough about people's willingness to produce hot air instead of working on the things they should all have in common.

Comment on Re: Full Stack vs. Glue
by Paul Boddie

Comments:

Most of what I've been reading is just advocacy dressed up as methodology: framework A is doing "the right thing" because of the perceived attitudes of their developers, the architectural choices, the ease of use (delete as appropriate), whereas framework B is doing "the wrong thing" because it does something different for all those things, all according to someone's sense of taste (or lack thereof).

As someone who writes software and discusses software, obviously advocacy and methodology mix. I program with the methodology I think is right. I advocate the methodology I think is right. I advocate the framework that implements the methodology I think is right. It's not dressing one thing up as the other thing -- it's the two faces of thoughtfully pursuing the craft.

# Ian Bicking